Sign In . Don't have a World Wisdom ID? Sign Up
Science and the Myth of Progress
Light on the Ancient Worlds: A Brief Survey of the Book by Frithjof Schuon
Quranic perspective on the nature of man: Video clips of Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf
The Sermon of All Creation: Christians on Nature
The Universal Spirit of Islam: Keys for Interfaith Understanding
What are the "Foundations of Christian Art?"
Spiritual Poetry
A Definition of the Perennial Philosophy
Memories (video clips) of Martin Lings by Michon and Petitpierre
The Fullness of God: Frithjof Schuon on Christianity
Slideshows
  Frithjof Schuon's interest in the Plains Indians Back to the List of Slideshows
    
slide 1 of 4

This is taken from a transcript of a 1995 interview with the eminent
Perennialist thinker and writer Frithjof Schuon (1907-1998).

Question : Your book The Feathered Sun reveals your interest in the American Indians. May I ask you what the stimulus of this interest or affinity is?

Frithjof Schuon: The Red Indians—and especially the Indians of the Plains—have much in common with the Japanese samurai, who very often practiced Zen spirituality; morally and aesthetically speaking, the Plains Indians were one of the most fascinating peoples of the world. It was the great mistake of the 19th century to distinguish only between “civilized people” and “savages”; there are distinctions which are far more real and important, for it is obvious that “civilization” in the ordinary sense is not the highest value of mankind, and also that the term “savage” is not suitable to the Indians.

Frithjof Schuon's response to this question is continued on the next slide.

Back to the List of Slideshows



Home | Books | DVDs | Authors | eProducts | Members | Slideshows | Library | Image-Gallery | Links | About Us | Sitemap




Privacy Statement
Copyright © 2008